Olde English Bulldogge Colors

Are you trying to decide what color you want your Olde English Bulldogge? We have photos of our pedigreed puppies. We invite you to browse to find your favorites.

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Black Brindle

Black Brindle

Brindle is a base coat color (usually golden or brown) with stripes or markings of a darker color. If “stripes/marks” are the same color as the pigment or the stripes or marks are so close together that they become the dominant color, the puppy is referred to as a black brindle.


Black Tipped Sable/Fawn

Black Tipped Sable/Fawn

A sable/fawn dominant coat color puppy (golden or lighter tan color at the roots) will have hairs that are “tipped” with black even though the puppy’s markings gives the tri-color effect (three or more colors)  a tri colored dog will not have hairs that are tipped with a darker color.

Sables, although having fawn colored hair, do have some darker hairs & etching in the coat, BUT they still have fawn colored hair predominately. Some sables show tan points, but not TRUE tan points. The sable genotype Ayat does not allow for the formation of ture tan points.


Black Tri

Black Tri

“Tri” is a nickname for the coat patterns of black, white and tan.  Tri puppies have tan points above the eyes (like eyebrows) and on the cheeks, with tan markings running up the legs and on the chest. A solid body color occurs giving coats Black, or White or sometimes Piebald patterns.


Black Trindle

Black Trindle

When Black Tri puppies have points on the legs where their coats are also brindled (or striped), this coat pattern is nicknamed “trindle”.


Blue Brindle

Blue Brindle

Brindle is a base coat color (usually golden, tan or brown) with stripes or markings of a darker color. A blue brindle puppy has two recessive genes that dilute any black color to a shade of gray. The stripes are a gray color, not the traditional black color with a lighter base coat. The nose is also usually a gray color.


Blue

Blue

A blue puppy may have any shade of blue-gray to gray-blue from deep slate to light blue/gray, always with a gray nose and hazel, blue or golden eye color.

Blue Bulldogs are diluted black dogs. The blue/grey coat should be shiny & look grey against black objects or in the sun. These dogs may or may not have a fawn undercoat when the hair is rubbed backwards. The nose, footpads, & eyeliner are always blue/grey, which can vary from light to dark, not to be mistaken for black.


Blue Fawn

Blue Fawn

In these dogs the hair does not change color as it does in a blue tri. The hair stays Fawn, while only the foot-pads, nose, and eyeliner (pigmented areas) change to blue (grey or silver color). The tips of some of the hairs on a blue fawn can not be blue like you see with a blue sable and the dog will have no black hairs. The genotype of a fawn is dd, ayay differing from a blue sable at the A locus. A blue sable has the genotype ayat at the a locus.


Blue and White

Blue and White

Blue Bulldogs are diluted black dogs. The blue/grey coat should be shiny & look grey against black objects or in the sun. These dogs may or may not have a fawn undercoat when the hair is rubbed backwards. The nose, footpads, & eyeliner are always blue/grey, which can vary from light to dark, not to be mistaken for black.

Most white spotting on dogs is determined by the genes on the S locus. When we use the term “white spotting” we simply mean white areas on the dog, not actually white spots. White spotting can occur on any color. So any dog can have white markings, whether they’re black, blue, liver, lilac, brindle, sable, tan-pointed, merle or whatever.

White hair occurs when the skin cells are unable to produce any pigment. The white spotting gene impairs the ability of cells on particular parts of the skin to make pigment, so the skin becomes pink and the fur white. Nails and paw pads will also become pink in areas where pigment is not produced.


Blue Fawn and White

Blue Fawn and White

In these dogs the hair does not change color as it does in a blue tri. The hair stays Fawn, while only the foot-pads, nose, and eyeliner (pigmented areas) change to blue (grey or silver color). The tips of some of the hairs on a blue fawn can not be blue like you see with a blue sable and the dog will have no black hairs.  

White hair occurs when the skin cells are unable to produce any pigment. The white spotting gene impairs the ability of cells on particular parts of the skin to make pigment, so the skin becomes pink and the fur white. Nails and paw pads will also become pink in areas where pigment is not produced.


Blue Sable

Blue Sable

These sable/fawn-coated puppies (golden or lighter tan color at the roots) will have hairs that are “tipped” with blue or dark gray. The blue sable has a pair of recessive genes referred to as the dilution gene that causes black coloring to be a gray color. The nose will also be a dark gray color not black. Any hairs that would be black on a sable dog are all gray in color.


Blue Tri

Blue Tri

 ”Tri” is a nickname for the black, white, and tan coat. These puppies have tan points above their eyes (like eyebrows) with circular tan patches on the cheeks, and tan markings running up the legs and on their chests. Blue Tri puppies have two recessive genes that dilute any black hairs in their coats to a gray color. They have a solid blue body color or can also come with white or Piebald patterns.


Blue Trindle

Blue Trindle

”Tri” is a nickname for the black, white, and tan coat. Blue Tri puppies have two recessive genes that dilute any black hairs in their coats to a gray color. They have a solid blue body color or can also come with white or Piebald patterns. Tri puppies have tan points above their eyes (like eyebrows) with circular tan patches on the cheeks, and tan markings running up the legs and on their chests. Sometimes these leg markings will also be brindled (or striped), which is how they got nicknamed “trindles”.


Brindle

Brindle

Brindle puppies have a base coat color (usually golden or brown) with stripes or markings of a darker color.


Brown Brindle

Brown Brindle

Brindle is a traditional bulldog color. Many dog breeds have a unique coloring called a brindle, which appears as either brown or a dusky tawny color with streaks of other colors mixed in. Brindle dogs have black stripes running across their body in the same direction as the ribs. Technically brindle is a marking pattern, but for ease of use most people refer to it as a color.

Brown brindle dogs have a base color that is caramel or fawn color with streaks of black running through the base color.


Chocolate

Chocolate

Chocolate coats range in color from very dark to milk chocolate shades. These dogs also have a nose and coloration around the eye that is chocolate/liver in color. Chocolate puppies have two recessive genes that prevent them from having black in their coats. 


Chocolate Tri

Chocolate Tri

Tri is a nickname for the black, white, and tan coat.  Chocolate tri dogs have 2 recessive genes that manipulates any black hairs in the coat to a milk chocolate, dark chocolate or liver color. Tri dogs will have tan points above the eyes (like eyebrows) and circular tan patches on the cheeks. Tan markings running up the legs and on the chest. Sometime these points on the legs will also be brindled which makes the dog a “trindle”.  Chocolate Tri dogs have a solid chocolate body color or can also come with white or Piebald patterns.


Dark Brindle

Dark Brindle

Many dog breeds have a unique coloring called a brindle, which appears as either brown or a dusky tawny color with streaks of other black mixed in. Brindle dogs have black stripes running across their body in the same direction as the ribs. Technically brindle is a marking pattern, but for ease of use most people refer to it as a color. Dark brindled bulldogs have a dark undercoat that is almost black closer to a coffee color. It can be difficult to distinguish the black streaks because the base coat color is dark brown.


Dark Chocolate Tri

Dark Chocolate Tri

Tri is a nickname for the black, white, and tan coat.  Chocolate tri dogs have 2 recessive genes that manipulates any black hairs in the coat to a milk chocolate, dark chocolate or liver color. Tri dogs will have tan points above the eyes (like eyebrows) and circular tan patches on the cheeks. Tan markings running up the legs and on the chest. Sometime these points on the legs will also be brindled which makes the dog a “trindle”.  Chocolate Tri dogs have a solid chocolate body color or can also come with white or Piebald patterns. A dark chocolate tri has a base coat color that is the dark version of the chocolate color. It is the result of a more numerous pigment cells producing additional color proteins.

 


Fawn

Fawn

The coat color fawn has a variety of light brown shades.  The coloration around the eyes and nose are always black. Fawn dogs do not have hairs tipped with another color.


Fawn and White

Fawn and White

The color fawn comes in a variety of light brown shades.  The coloration around the eyes \ and nose are always black. Fawn dogs do not have hairs tipped with another color. The fawn color is determined by the A locus. A fawn dog has the genotype ayay at the A locus where a sable dog has fawn colored hairs but also has numerous hairs that have a black tip because the genotype at the A locus for a sable bulldog is ayat. White hair occurs when the skin cells are unable to produce any pigment. The white spotting gene impairs the ability of cells on particular parts of the skin to make pigment, so the skin becomes pink and the fur white. Nails and paw pads will also become pink in areas where pigment is not produced.


Lilac

Lilac

Lilac is a dilute of brown. Instead of being brown the coat appears to be dusted causing a purple appearance. No black or brown hairs are present within the coat. Lilac is slightly more complicated than dilute of black because it is a multi-recessive coat coloration. What does this mean? For a puppy to result in the coat coloration of lilac it must posses two identical pairs of alleles being both brown and dilute resulting genetically as d/d, b/b.

Lilacs are also born with blue eyes, much much lighter than that of blues. Into adulthood their eye coloration darkens to either an amber brown or a hazel gold.


Lilac Tri

Lilac Tri

Tri is a nickname for the black, white, and tan coat.  Lilac or Isabell tri dogs have 2 recessive genes that dilute any black hairs in the coat to a chocolate color and 2 different recessive genes that dilute the chocolate color to a blonde or taupe. Lilac tri is a dilute version of chocolate. The dog must have 4 sets of specific recessive genes in a specific combination. This combination of so many recessive genes make lilac tri dogs very very rare. Tri dogs will have tan points above the eyes (like eyebrows) and circular tan patches on the cheeks. Tan markings running up the legs and on the chest. Sometime these points on the legs will also be brindled which makes the dog a “trindle”.  Lilac tri dogs have a solid body color or can also come with white or Piebald patterns.